On Being Bold

Many of you know that I have a fondness for pools. Today, my husband and I decided that we are officially old to go for an early-morning swim. Arrive after noon or 1pm, and it’s impossible to not have a head-on collision in the water get across the pool. In typical bureaucratic fashion For some mysterious reason, 99% of pools in Vienna are closed for most of September and October (probably in order to clean a summer’s worth of crap out of them give the lifeguards some time off). As a result, we’ve been forced to swim at a pool in Germany at the very edge of the city. It takes us a good 40 minutes to get there. For New Yorkers, this is nothing, so forgive me for the complaint. But this is Vienna, and there is literally a pool up the street. If only it weren’t closed forever under construction until 2014.

After we did our laps and were feeling smug for having gotten off our fat asses stretching on the side, I noticed something sweet as can be: A group of 10 or so middle-aged women were learning to jump off the diving board.

Now, if I’m being generous, this diving board was about half a foot two feet off the ground. We’re not talking about Greg Louganis here. The gaggle of ladies lined up like they were in nursery school, and one after the other, sort of…fell into the pool. They even had a special preparatory stance: Arms out to the side, legs scissored open. Most of them stood on the board, looked out at their shivering cohorts in horror — how I can I possibly do this? — opened their limbs, took a big breath in, sealed their mouths shut, and slid into the pool. Or crashed into it. One woman, who was wearing pants, a dress and a bathing cap, got onto the board, stood there for some time mulling it over, dismounted, watched a friend jump in, and then tried again. On the second go, she made it into the water.

They were so pleased with themselves! So proud, as they got in and out of the water, in and out, in and out.

It got me thinking about being bold — about taking physical risks. Of course I don’t know the first thing about these women, but I cannot imagine that there was some vital reason that they learn to jump off a diving board at age 40. But they were doing it anyway.

Because of my back injury, I’ve taken very few physical risks in the last few years. At first this was earth-shattering frustrating. I loved trying the hardest yoga poses, the weirdest, most exhilarating partnering, leaping higher, faster, more boldly. The bruises on my elbows and scratched knees were proof. And then I just…couldn’t.

Back in the days when I loved living in mid-air.

In the last few weeks, I’ve rolled out my yoga mat for the first time in over 5 years. And I’ve practiced the most rudimentary poses you can imagine taken some real risks. The practice lasts about 12 minutes looks nothing like it used to when I could last more than 12 minutes balance on my hands, but I am spreading my limbs, and taking a big breath in (and out). There is no reason for this. Just the willingness to jump in again.

xo

5 thoughts on “On Being Bold

  1. Pat McNees says:

    Love this post.The pool looks lovely. I can picture the women but also half-wished you’d taken a picture of them. At 40 appearing in a bathing suit in public is risky.

    • Abigail Rasminsky says:

      For some reason I don’t think it’s as risky here. Not the same obsession with weight — they were of all shapes and sizes, as have most of the women I’ve seen at European pools! What an amazing thing!

  2. Cate says:

    Oh, I can really see those ladies up there, gathering their courage to take the leap. Having little children around means that I almost daily see them taking some big leap into the unknown. When I have to do the same, I always picture them taking that heroic step even though it is difficult and frightening. Even though you just did the simplest poses, Abby, isn’t that where the actual yoga happens?

    • Abigail Rasminsky says:

      I love that image, Cate, of picturing your own kids as you try something new and frightening. (I also always think of David Nichtern talking about a little boy in little league going up to bat with his knees shaking.) Yes, that’s where the real yoga happens. It’s liberating to have so little ambition. To just…get on the mat. Thanks for reading! xo

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